The Age of Doing Things, or An Introduction

“Percentage wise, it is 100% easier not to do things than to do them.”
                              – John Mulaney

Those who are in the same boat as me, this boat being the particular boat one sails after recently graduating from college in your early twenties, will agree with me that we are all in the “Age of Doing Things.” Now I realize that this phrase is not quite up to scratch in terms of specificity, so let me elaborate. Everyone that has been on this boat with you seems to be abandoning ship for very different ones. Left and right, friends are getting jobs, moving to different cities, getting engaged, getting married, heck even producing their own spawn. And here you are, still on that same boat, only now, its starting to feel rather like that boat isn’t even under you anymore. Instead you find yourself sporting a couple of arm floaties and kicking your feet to keep your head above water.

It is a sensation worsened by the presence of social media. When success comes, your friends all love to share it. Every week you see someone different start a brand new “big kid job” as they like to call it, followed by a thumbs up emoji and a picture of them with their brand new picture I.D. and lanyard. Friends are moving to bigger and better cities, living it large and in charge. They are in serious relationships. So serious, in fact, that they seem to be getting married left and right. Lately it seems as though you don’t even recognize the names of half the people in your news feed, all because they changed it the day they became someone’s spouse. They are creating, producing, making connections, and you – what are you doing?

You are doing what many people would call nothing. You are drinking a beer. You are working through Friends and you’re already on Season 8 – not because its particularly good, but because it is nice, brainless television to have on as background noise while your roommate is out Doing Things. You are learning new songs on the ukulele (not the guitar though because that’s still too hard). You are running out of different things to say when your roommate comes home and asks how your day was and what exactly you did.

In vain you think, maybe it will all be better just as soon as you can get a job. You stick your neck out repeatedly, writing resumes and cover letters, going to interviews, trying to appear confident yet not overly pompous – its all just a terribly long, personal living hell. You think you’ve done your best, and then the wind’s knocked out of you every time you receive the news that someone else doesn’t want you. You search again, you apply again, you hope to have another interview – as they say, lather, rinse, repeat. Even when you finally land a gig, you’re not as excited about it as you perhaps should be, because there goes your life.

So, no matter what things you do, everyone around you seems to have the bigger and better things, and you wonder at what point did they all jump so far ahead of you? Or rather, where did you fall behind?

When I say “you,” I of course, am referring to myself. This is about me after all. I don’t even know you. However, my reason for writing this blog and for pondering all these uncomfortable feelings that will undoubtedly come forth in this new Age, is to get to know you. Or at the very least, simply to know that you are out there. That you too might be wearing the same floaties as I am.

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2 thoughts on “The Age of Doing Things, or An Introduction

  1. Pingback: Frustration Nation and Feeling Stuck – Post.Degree

  2. Pingback: My Job Is Not My Identity: A Necessary Self-Reminder | Post.Degree

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